Oklahoma lawmakers seek to implement data privacy protections

Oklahoma lawmakers are seeking to put in place protections for data privacy. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are trying to stop tech companies from sharing digital information without your permission. “It’s not the kind of thing with a tinfoil hat. It is a fearful and legitimate thing that we are being exploited and manipulated without our knowledge and consent, and this must stop,” said Collin Walke. or which companies now have this information. “Anyone who has used the Life 360 ​​app to track their kids knows where their kids were, thinking they were doing something right and they were safe. Wrong. They were selling kids location data to data brokers,” Walke said. Walke also pointed to sites and devices like Alexa, Facebook, Google, and Pokemon Go. “It wasn’t your data in the first place. one must enjoy it, that’s me,” Walke said. It says you have the right to correct this information if it’s incorrect. It says you have the right to delete this information. The fourth thing that makes our bill really unique is that you have to sign up for them to collect your data or sell your data,” Walke said. Not everyone agrees. The State House is adamantly opposed, claiming that regulations create a confusing hodgepodge of laws that businesses sockets need to sort. They said “the bill does not focus on inappropriate data practices. Instead, there needs to be a one-size-fits-all approach,” and added, “the Chamber will continue to stand up for the business community.”

Oklahoma lawmakers are seeking to put in place protections for data privacy.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are trying to stop tech companies from sharing digital information without your permission.

“It’s not the kind of thing with a tinfoil hat. It is a fearful and legitimate thing that we are being exploited and manipulated without our knowledge and consent, and this must stop,” said Collin Walke.

Oklahoma City’s Walke said people don’t realize how much information is out there or who or what companies now have that information.

“Anyone who has used the Life 360 ​​app to track their kids knows where their kids thought they were doing something right and safe. Wrong. They were selling kids location data to money brokers. data,” Walke said.

Walke also pointed to sites and devices like Alexa, Facebook, Google, and Pokemon Go.

“It wasn’t your data in the first place. It’s mine. If anyone should take advantage of it, it’s me,” Walke said.

Walke is now pushing House Bill 2969.

“It means you have the right to inspect and access your data. It says you have the right to correct this information if it is incorrect. It says you have the right to delete this information. The fourth thing what makes our bill really unique is that you have to register for them to collect your data or sell your data,” Walke said.

Not everyone is on board. The State House is adamantly opposed, saying the regulations create a confusing hodgepodge of laws that businesses must sort through.

They said “the bill does not focus on inappropriate data practices. Instead, there needs to be a one-size-fits-all approach,” and added, “the Chamber will continue to stand up for the business community.”

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