Oklahoma tax – Rogers County Blue Star Mothers http://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 07:24:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T143024.308.png Oklahoma tax – Rogers County Blue Star Mothers http://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/ 32 32 Philippe Redwine | Obituaries | Norman transcription https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/philippe-redwine-obituaries-norman-transcription/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/philippe-redwine-obituaries-norman-transcription/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 07:24:59 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/philippe-redwine-obituaries-norman-transcription/ Philip W. Redwine March 21, 1942 – October 17, 2021 Philip Warren Redwine was born to Adolphus Carrol (AC) and Iva Clarice (Berryhill) Redwine in Dewey, Oklahoma on March 21, 1942. He died in Oklahoma City after a long illness on October 17, 2021. After Phil’s birth, the family moved to Pawhuska, Oklahoma, where AC […]]]>

March 21, 1942
October 17, 2021

Philip Warren Redwine was born to Adolphus Carrol (AC) and Iva Clarice (Berryhill) Redwine in Dewey, Oklahoma on March 21, 1942. He died in Oklahoma City after a long illness on October 17, 2021.
After Phil’s birth, the family moved to Pawhuska, Oklahoma, where AC worked for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company until his death. Phil had an ordinary childhood in a small town in Oklahoma, centered around the early Christian church, schools and sports of Pawhuska. In high school, he played football, baseball and basketball. He graduated from Pawhuska HS in May 1960.
After graduating from high school, Phil attended Philips University, then transferred to Oklahoma State University. While at OSU, he was initiated into the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity and remained a fan of OSU throughout his life. Phil met Sarah Ann Redwine at OSU because they had the same last name. They became good friends and started dating after two years. They became engaged in the fall of 1963 and were married on June 6, 1964 in Spiro, Oklahoma, at the First Baptist Church. They celebrated the 57th anniversary of a wonderful marriage this year. Phil graduated from Northeastern State University in May 1965 and enrolled in the University of Oklahoma Law School that fall. He graduated from OU Law School in the spring of 1968. While studying law, he was a member of the Phi Alpha Delta Law Society. He worked in the law library and other part-time jobs. He was part of the ROTC, was appointed Distinguished Military Student and Graduate, and was appointed Captain in the United States Army.
Upon admission to the Judge Advocate General Corps in September 1968, he enrolled in the JAG School at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. Phil and Sarah’s first son, Philip, Jr., was born on November 15, 1968 in Norman while Phil was attending JAG School. After Phil graduated from Jag School, he was assigned to Fort. Ritchie, MD, as assistant to the JAG officer and Sarah and Philip, Jr. joined him in January 1969. Within a year he became the JAG officer. The Redwines were very involved in postal activities and enjoyed visiting Washington, DC and other historic sites that were nearby. In the fall of 1970, he was transferred to Pine Bluff Dockyard, Pine Bluff, Arkansas, as a JAG officer where he served for two years. Upon completion of his military service, he received the Army Meritorious Service Medal from the Judge Advocate General Corps. While at Pine Bluff Arsenal, their second son, Frederick, was born on September 18, 1971. After four years in the military, Phil and Sarah were happy to return to Norman with their family and he went to work as a lawyer. for Tom Lucas. He began his own law practice in April 1973. A third son, Ryan Allan, was born July 3, 1977 in Norman.
Phil got involved in many activities. He was a member of the Norman Rotary Club and Paul Harris Fellow. He was director of the Norman Chamber of Commerce and wrote the organizational document for the Sooner Theater. He was also involved in the Mr. Red Hot Stockings Follies for the Norman Hospital Foundation, served as president of the Norman Athletic Association and raised funds to build the indoor baseball facility at Norman High School. He also raised funds to expand the Fire House art barracks. He worked with Sarah on numerous Norman public school projects and fundraisers over the years while their children attended Norman schools. He coached many baseball teams for his three boys as they grew up. He loved sports and being with his sons in their teams. He was also very active in the Boy Scouts and all the other activities that the boys were involved in. He also enjoyed fishing and playing golf with his children and grandchildren.
His general law practice focused on corporate law, estate planning and civil litigation. He enjoyed helping others, solving problems and often maintained his services to those in need. He worked on cases concerning the entry of Walmart into Norman as well as a case involving the extension of the dairy which required the closure of Symmes Street. Another remarkable case that Phil worked on resulted in the creation of the current Sarkey Foundation.
As a lawyer, Phil was selected as a supernumerary judge of the Supreme Court to help reduce the backlog of Supreme Court cases. Gov. David L. Boren appointed Phil Supernumerary Insurance Commissioner when the current Insurance Commissioner refused his office to honor a request from a foreign insurance company for a license from Oklahoma. In 2018, he received recognition from the Oklahoma Bar Association for over 50 years of membership. His professional memberships include the Oklahoma Bar Association, the Cleveland County Bar Association, the United States Military Court of Appeals, the Oklahoma State Supreme Court, and the United States Tax Court. United.
Phil was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 1987 and battled the disease for over 30 years. He has often been called upon by the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society to speak at their meetings to encourage others in their fight against cancer.
Phil and Sarah have been members of the First Baptist Church since 1973. He has held a variety of positions over the years, including providing legal advice as part of his church service. He served on the Family Life Center building committee and worked with Sarah on many church projects and activities. His Christian faith was very important to him, and he lived it daily in his activities and interactions with others.
He is survived by the best partner and wife a man can have (his words), Sarah Ann Redwine, of the house. They saw each other as a team. Survivors include her children, Philip, Jr. (Dedra), Frederick (Justin) and Ryan (Stacy) as well as ten grandchildren, Hayley Suzanne Goodspeed (Lucas), Brooke Elizabeth Redwine, Philip Warren Redwine III (Trace), Brysan Allan Redwine, Tillman Beau Redwine, Holdan Troy Redwine, LeAnna Faith Redwine, Warran Terry Redwine, Daxan Lee Redwine and Laytan Reece Redwine. Phil loved and appreciated his children and grandchildren and spent many happy times with them. He was proud of them and thought each one was very special. He encouraged them in all their efforts and activities. He wanted them to be good citizens, people of faith and always try to do their best. He was as special to each of them as they were to him. They called him “Papy” or “Papa”.
He is also survived by his siblings, Carroll Redwine (Shirley) of Ardmore, OK, Jane Bartlett (Bruce, deceased) of Kansas City, MO, Judge James M. Redwine (Peg) of Barnsdall, OK and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, AC and Clarice Redwine, and the parents of Sarah, RL and Vermelle Redwine.
Memorial services will be held at 2:00 pm on Friday, October 22, 2021, at First Baptist Church, 2ll W. Comanche, with Dr. Ryan Redwine and Dr. Wade Smith officiating. Honorary bearers will be Phil’s grandchildren and the Primetimers Life Group class of which Phil has been a member for 48 years. The family will receive friends at Hallock Hall immediately after the service.
Memorial donations can be made to The Baptist Homes for Children (head office), 3800 N. May Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112; Donations: 405-942-3800, ext. 4688. Online condolences can be made at www.tribute.care. The service will be broadcast live by First Baptist Church of Norman.

Published on 20 October 2021


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BUGGING OUT: More than 80 Volkswagens converge on Tahlequah for the OKsWagen festival | New https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/bugging-out-more-than-80-volkswagens-converge-on-tahlequah-for-the-okswagen-festival-new/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/bugging-out-more-than-80-volkswagens-converge-on-tahlequah-for-the-okswagen-festival-new/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 23:30:52 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/bugging-out-more-than-80-volkswagens-converge-on-tahlequah-for-the-okswagen-festival-new/ Locals and visitors gathered in Norris Park late Saturday morning to bug each other at the annual OKsWagen VW festival. The event is hosted by the Oklahoma Chapter of the Foul Air Klub, and gives fans a chance to show off their Volkswagens. Visitors were able to discover more than 80 vehicles registered this year. […]]]>

Locals and visitors gathered in Norris Park late Saturday morning to bug each other at the annual OKsWagen VW festival.

The event is hosted by the Oklahoma Chapter of the Foul Air Klub, and gives fans a chance to show off their Volkswagens. Visitors were able to discover more than 80 vehicles registered this year.

Tahlequah Main Street Association director Jamie Hale said it was the biggest turnout they had ever seen.

“OKsWagen is a very unique event – original, if you will,” Hale said. “I love that this brings such a diverse group of people to Tahlequah. OKsWagen, formerly known as V-Dubs on Main, has been around for about seven years, but to my knowledge the Foul Air Klub hasn’t always been involved, and that makes a huge difference. “

The Volkswagens were lined up on both sides of North Muskogee Avenue between Morgan Street and Goingsnake Street. Coweta’s Indigo Tie Dye Co. and other small-scale vendors were also at the scene.

Musicians Joe Mack, Dominic Roy, Casey West, Andrew Harmon, Kyron Lee and Hunter Ragland performed from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Norris Park.

Gale Bogle owns several Volkswagens and has been collecting classic cars for 25 years.

“I sold 80 of them to an auction company in St. Louis,” Bogle said. “My wife says I don’t need to buy cars anymore, but I got back to 30 [cars] now.”

Hale started planning for this event about four months ago and she said each entity has a job to do for the big day.

Foul Air Klub took care of the auto show part; TMSA and Century 21 Wright Real Estate have partnered to manage logistics with the city, suppliers and operations; and Kroner and Baer had the garden covered with beer and children.

“The Foul Air Klub is a very well-oiled machine. They all manage their own registrations and trophies and are a great group of people, ”Hale said.

Kedrin “Speedy” Arnett said the organization was created for Volkswagen lovers to come together and all proceeds to go to various charities across the country.

There are 14 Foul Air Klub sections in eight states, with approximately 3,000 members in the Oklahoma section. The Oklahoma Club hosts four events each year, in Tahlequah, Siloam Springs and Eureka Springs, Arkansas, and the Foul Air 500.

Steve and Carson Rhodes came from Sapulpa after hearing about OKsWagen on social media. They recently bought a Volkswagen because it is a “very unique car”.

Frank Carroll first brought his 1969 Berry Mini T Dune Buggy, and he said he plans to bring his classic car back to future events.

“I don’t usually collect Volkswagens, but I collect cars and usually play with a Rambler,” he said. “It’s a toy and it was cute, but I want to make it look better [next year]. “

Hale said the event helped introduce sales tax through vendors, and restaurants and stores were buzzing all day Saturday.

“We are already discussing extending road closures for next year to provide space for more cars, and we would also like to add some more activities,” Hale said.


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Scott Dixon announces Ward 8 candidacy https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/scott-dixon-announces-ward-8-candidacy/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/scott-dixon-announces-ward-8-candidacy/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 13:46:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/scott-dixon-announces-ward-8-candidacy/ October 17 — Scott Dixon announced his candidacy for the Ward 8 seat in the Norman City Council election in February 2022. The candidate plans to focus on homelessness, stormwater, public safety and improving business relationships and advice for economic growth. Councilor Matthew Peacock currently occupies Ward 8 headquarters. Dixon said he had been following […]]]>

October 17 — Scott Dixon announced his candidacy for the Ward 8 seat in the Norman City Council election in February 2022.

The candidate plans to focus on homelessness, stormwater, public safety and improving business relationships and advice for economic growth. Councilor Matthew Peacock currently occupies Ward 8 headquarters.

Dixon said he had been following council meetings for two years, but it wasn’t until council reallocated $ 865,000 from the budget increase proposed by the Norman Police Department on June 16, 2020 that he decided to run for the seat. In July 2020, he joined Unite Norman, a group that formed to recall Odd City Councilors and Mayor Breea Clark.

“It looks like the board overall is anti-business, anti-development, anti-everything,” Dixon said. “We seem to be falling further behind and other cities seem way ahead of us in many ways.”

City staff members told council about a multi-year growth lag in sales tax revenues; those conversations at board meetings were not lost on Dixon, he said.

To boost revenue, the candidate said he would be willing to consider a controversial project: the arena proposed by the University of Oklahoma Foundation. The proposed 10,000-seat arena included space for restaurants, a plaza for events and festivals.

“The sales tax revenue generated by the arena will be transformational for Norman,” Dixon said.

The foundation applied for tax incentives through the North Park University tax increase district in 2018. It was a project that met resistance from the council and ended up in court after the Former OU general counsel Fred Gipson filed a lawsuit in 2018 to force the foundation to turn over many of the cases he alleged were subject to the state’s open records law. The parties have settled.

The foundation withdrew its application in July 2018, preventing the council from voting on the project and protecting it for future consideration by the council. Foundation spokesperson Chip Carter said the foundation agreed not to seek tax incentives, and foundation attorney Sean Rieger said it was withdrawn due to the lack of tax incentives. board support.

As the foundation sought $ 102.7 million in district funds to fund tax increases, it also pledged an increase in sales tax revenue to the tune of $ 400 million in private investment.

“I would like to work with [Cleveland] County and the OU Foundation to build the arena at UNP to really turn this area into a destination entertainment area, ”Dixon said.

While the arena is an example of Dixon’s ideals opposed to those of the board, he backed Dais 2020’s general bond package to offset the Norman futures sales tax fund’s deficits by half a cent. Voters refused to support him and Unite Norman took credit for his failure.

“I would like to review those links,” Dixon said. “I saw the bonds close as a sort of vote of no confidence in the board.”

He also agrees with the council that $ 60 million in city-wide stormwater projects needs to be addressed with a financing solution. The city has no utility charge for stormwater, and voters turned down bond proposals in 2016 and 2019.

“We keep kicking that can on the road,” he said. “This is the endless problem that I would like to work for a fair solution, to find a solution.”

If elected, Dixon also hopes to tackle homelessness – he wants to ensure that those released from mental health facilities have immediate support to prevent them from ending up on the streets, he said. declared. He was aware of the need for affordable housing and said improving relationships with developers could mean more people will consider building in Norman.

Although he has no experience in local government, Dixon cited his experience on several committees, including the board of directors, at the McFarlin Memorial United Methodist Church. He and his wife Tiffany attend Victory Church with their two children. Tiffany is the principal of Roosevelt Elementary School.

Dixon is originally from Chickasha and moved to Norman in 2008. He received a BS in Construction Science from OU in 2003 and an MS in Energy Management from Oklahoma City University in 2020. Afterwards a career in oil and gas sales, he is now a pharmaceutical sales representative.

Mindy Wood covers Town Hall news and notable court cases for The Transcript. Contact her at mwood@normantranscript.com or 405-416-4420.


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Policy issues: Housing statistics show disparities between states https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/policy-issues-housing-statistics-show-disparities-between-states/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/policy-issues-housing-statistics-show-disparities-between-states/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 22:45:38 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/policy-issues-housing-statistics-show-disparities-between-states/ Rose of Ahniwake Homeownership has always been the cornerstone of the American dream. For many of our friends and neighbors, however, this part of the dream is increasingly beyond reach. Growing numbers of Oklahoma are finding that the decision between renting and buying a home has already been made for them. The odds are against […]]]>

Rose of Ahniwake

Homeownership has always been the cornerstone of the American dream. For many of our friends and neighbors, however, this part of the dream is increasingly beyond reach. Growing numbers of Oklahoma are finding that the decision between renting and buying a home has already been made for them. The odds are against potential homebuyers today due to soaring house prices, stagnant wages for low-income workers, rising childcare costs for families, household debt. student loans for many young Oklahomans, and more.

Looking around the state, about 2 in 3 Oklahoma residents own their homes. Homeownership rates are slightly lower in metropolitan areas and communities near state military bases; the percentage of owners is generally higher in rural areas. (Payne County – home to Oklahoma State University – has the highest renter rate in the state at 48%. Logan County has the highest home ownership rate. state raised to 83%.)

Overall homeownership in the state has declined by around two percentage points over the past three decades and is slightly above the national average. By unwrapping these numbers a little more, you can see that homeownership trends point to growing racial disparity. Over the past 30 years, the homeownership rate among Whites in Oklahoma has risen to 71%, while Latinx homeownership in the state has increased by just over seven percentage points to reach about 54%.

The declines in the homeownership rate in Oklahoma are being borne by our black neighbors whose homeownership rates have declined by nearly eight percentage points to just under 40%. These numbers are despite a decreasing number of white households in Oklahoma and a growing number of black households.

The overall trend in housing affordability will be one that is difficult to reverse. There are, however, ways to help eliminate some of the inconveniences for low-income Oklahoma residents who are forced to rent due to financial circumstances. Options could include expanding the low-income property tax credit to all homeowners and tenants earning less than $ 12,000 per year and creating a tenant tax credit equal to the value. of the exemption on homestead. Both are low-cost proposals that would put money back in the pockets of working people in Oklahoma while also helping to alleviate some of the racial disparities in the state.

Ahniwake Rose is Executive Director of the Oklahoma Policy Institute.


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Letter: The gap widens between the actions of elected officials and the needs of Oklahoma | Letters to the Editor https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/letter-the-gap-widens-between-the-actions-of-elected-officials-and-the-needs-of-oklahoma-letters-to-the-editor/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/letter-the-gap-widens-between-the-actions-of-elected-officials-and-the-needs-of-oklahoma-letters-to-the-editor/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 07:30:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/letter-the-gap-widens-between-the-actions-of-elected-officials-and-the-needs-of-oklahoma-letters-to-the-editor/ If you haven’t noticed it yet, the “political divide” between the elected Republican leaders of Oklahoma and those they are supposed to represent continues to widen. If the subject is about masks and vaccines; the rich paying their fair share of taxes; close corporate tax loopholes; protection of social security and health insurance; strengthening of […]]]>

If you haven’t noticed it yet, the “political divide” between the elected Republican leaders of Oklahoma and those they are supposed to represent continues to widen.

If the subject is about masks and vaccines; the rich paying their fair share of taxes; close corporate tax loopholes; protection of social security and health insurance; strengthening of public education; or the chaotic evacuation of the United States in Afghanistan, the distance between the opinions and views of our governor, our two American senators, and at least three of our American deputies, continues to differ from those of a significant proportion of Oklahoma voters.

Given that Governor Kevin Stitt, Senator Jim Inhofe and United States Representatives Kevin Hern and Markwayne Mullin are millionaires, and given that the interests of millionaires generally differ significantly from those of the middle / lower class – and given that the latter are much more numerous the first – is it really surprising that these elected officials often seem out of step with those they claim to represent?

I have nothing personal against the rich, especially those who honestly won it. But I have something against wealthy political “leaders” who use their elected positions to promote their own interests over the very real interests and needs of those who elected them.

Letters to the editor are encouraged. Send letters to tulsaworld.com/opinion/submitletter.


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Searcy’s Sales Tax To Be In Bottom Five Of 70 Cities Without 1%, Group Spokesman Says | New https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/searcys-sales-tax-to-be-in-bottom-five-of-70-cities-without-1-group-spokesman-says-new/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/searcys-sales-tax-to-be-in-bottom-five-of-70-cities-without-1-group-spokesman-says-new/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/searcys-sales-tax-to-be-in-bottom-five-of-70-cities-without-1-group-spokesman-says-new/ Moving Searcy Forward looked at 70 Arkansas cities for total sales taxes, according to Will Moore, spokesperson for the community tax support group, and found that Searcy’s is on average right now. Without the temporary 1% tax, he said the city would be among the bottom five among those communities. “We want to be a […]]]>

Moving Searcy Forward looked at 70 Arkansas cities for total sales taxes, according to Will Moore, spokesperson for the community tax support group, and found that Searcy’s is on average right now. Without the temporary 1% tax, he said the city would be among the bottom five among those communities.

“We want to be a vibrant community for ourselves today and for generations to come,” Moore said at a Zoom “In the Know” forum hosted earlier this week by the Searcy Regional Chamber of Commerce. “We want to make sure the city has adequate funding to provide citizens with basic municipal services and we want to be a community that works with all of our citizens to determine how we can improve the quality of life for everyone in Searcy. “

The first step in this process, according to Moore, is securing basic municipal services. “We want to make sure, as citizens, that we have done everything possible to provide the city with adequate funding to ensure that it can provide these services.”

Early voting for a November 9 special election that would make the eight-year one-cent sales and use tax passed in 2014 permanent begins on November 2 at the White County Cooperative Extension Service Office, 2400 Landing Road, and will take place 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays until November 8.

Moore said that in the seven years of the one-cent tax’s existence, $ 6.5 million was the average collection of revenue on an annual basis. Breakdowns of continuing annual needs for the income of a cent, he said, are police and firefighters, $ 1,566,000; infrastructure, $ 2,644,000; sanitation, $ 653,000; economic development, $ 500,000; courts and administration, $ 193,000; reserve fund, $ 250,000; and parks and recreation, $ 694,000. (These breakdowns are available at cityofsearcy.org.)

Among the needs of the police and firefighters, he said, there is $ 750,000 per year for retirement which “is an obligation that does not disappear regardless of the results of the November 9 vote. It’s a state-imposed obligation, so Searcy needs it. -cents of income to do so.

Through the Arkansas legislative audit, Moore said the group found that almost every city in the state had raised property taxes to “cover their exposure to the police and retired firefighters.” The Town of Searcy chose not to do this and as citizens of Searcy I think this is something we all benefit from, but they [the city] have to find a way to generate income to cover this obligation, and that comes from the sales tax. “

The city, Moore said, has a fleet of 36 police vehicles and around 20 cars for investigative and administrative purposes. “All of these cars have a fixed lifespan. They should be replaced on a reasonable basis. With this fleet replacement, they are able to replace around six police cars per year and around two administrative cars per year. Fleet expenses are $ 200,000 per year and personnel requirements for police and firefighters are $ 544,000 more than current expenses ($ 3,576,353 in 2020).

The infrastructure, streets, drainage and sidewalks needs were estimated at $ 2,598,000 and the additional staff requirements for these areas were estimated at $ 46,000. For sanitation, needs of $ 522,000 have been granted for the fleet and $ 131,000 for personnel.

Moore said he thinks it is great that the city also wants to invest in itself in economic development, workforce development, job creation and ready-to-go sites. He said the city could “put the wind in its sails and invest in some great programs.”

The reserve fund discussion included a discussion of a rainy day fund and $ 250,000 for matching grants. “I think it’s very reasonable for us to expect our city to have a savings account,” Moore said.

Turning to parks and recreation, Moore said the staffing was $ 86,000 and maintenance and operations were listed at $ 608,000.

“From what we understand, Parks and Rec has not had a budget increase for over five years, so this ensures additional operating funds for Parks and Rec,” he said. “As a person with young children,” said Moore, “he would love to see the parks, football fields and baseball complexes in a well-maintained way that the city could be proud of.”

Quality of life was then brought up, but Moore said you couldn’t really talk about it until Stage 1 was safe. “We need to secure our core funding before we can consider moving to step 2.”

Crafton Tull is a civil engineering firm that was hired by the city that primarily focuses on primary planning, according to Moore. He said the cabinet is focused on “citizen feedback from across the community.”

Moore shared photos of places like Conway, Hot Springs, Pine Bluff and Maumelle as well as towns in Oklahoma and Texas where Crafton Tull worked. He said the company also makes parking systems and can calculate sidewalk requirements. Moore said the company will be able to give the city good feedback on the development of Riverside Park.

He said he liked to see this as a five or ten year plan so that the city administration of today and tomorrow has “some continuity”.

To pay for all of the city’s needs, Moore said, it has two main sources of revenue: sales taxes and property tax. He said the November 9 measure simply held the “green line where it stands.” It is not a tax increase; we all pay it today. It would just continue to apply the same tax rate.

He said that if the tax passed in 2014 were allowed to expire in June 2022, “not only would it be the lowest of this group of cities, but when you look at that in the context of the other mechanism that a city has to raise, generate income, property taxes, Searcy is already at the bottom.

Searcy’s property tax is also “100 percent allotted to one thing – all of our property tax dollars go to the police and firefighters’ pension fund.” It does not cover the whole obligation. … “

“So if we allow our sales tax to go low with our property tax already low, you know I think we can all start to see how things stack up and how the services provided by our city should be adjusted. “

Most of the numbers and comparisons Moore used showing that Searcy would be at the bottom of the city sales tax rate and the bottom of the property tax rate compared to the following cities: Jonesboro (pop. 78,576), Farmington (7,584), Jacksonville (population 29,477). ), Heber Springs (6,969), Conway (64,124), Sherwood (32,731). Maumelle (19,251), Russellville (28,940), Benton (35,014), Siloam Springs (17,287), Batesville (11,191), Bryant (20,663), Bentonville (54,164), Fayetteville (93,949) and Little Rock (202 591).

However, Moore said the larger group of 70 cities was used because the group wanted to “go further and have a better comparison.”


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U.S. state tax cuts for fiscal 2022 could complicate longer-term budgets https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/u-s-state-tax-cuts-for-fiscal-2022-could-complicate-longer-term-budgets/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/u-s-state-tax-cuts-for-fiscal-2022-could-complicate-longer-term-budgets/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 05:15:30 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/u-s-state-tax-cuts-for-fiscal-2022-could-complicate-longer-term-budgets/ Thursday, Oct 7, 2021 / 6:08 AM / by Fitch Ratings / Header image credit: Arizona Mirror U.S. states have cut taxes more than expected over the past fiscal season, with some of the most significant changes likely requiring tough budget choices going forward, according to Fitch Ratings. Fitch considers a state’s ability to maintain […]]]>

Thursday, Oct 7, 2021 / 6:08 AM / by Fitch Ratings / Header image credit: Arizona Mirror

U.S. states have cut taxes more than expected over the past fiscal season, with some of the most significant changes likely requiring tough budget choices going forward, according to Fitch Ratings. Fitch considers a state’s ability to maintain fiscal balance when assessing the credit implications of tax changes.

Permanent tax changes can pose fiscal challenges if they are primarily driven by one-time revenue surpluses, and states with lower levels of financial resilience due to low reserves or funds for rainy days are more likely to risk. More than a third of state governments have incorporated some form of tax relief into final FY2022 budgets, as exceptional revenue performance in FY2021 dramatically increased cash and reserve levels statutory.


Eighteen states have enacted tax cuts of some sort this year, 12 of which have cut income taxes, while six have enacted a mix of tax exemptions for federal stimulus and unemployment payments or have reduced property and / or utility taxes statewide. Minnesota and Wisconsin proposed tax increases in their executive budgets for fiscal year 2022, but ultimately reduced taxes in their final adopted budgets. Only five states have increased or enacted new income or sales taxes for fiscal 2022: Florida, New York, New Jersey, Washington, and Missouri, which have also implemented new tax cuts. .

Many of the tax cuts adopted were larger than those initially proposed at the start of this year’s budget season. Iowa and Missouri also accelerated the phased introduction of pre-existing income tax cuts by removing or modifying income triggers included in previous legislation. Iowa, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, and Oklahoma cut multiple taxes at once, and Arizona, Iowa, Idaho, Montana, and Ohio cut tax rates. taxation while eliminating or consolidating entire tax brackets.

States cut taxes amid robust income growth in fiscal 2021 that exceeded their initially low forecasts made at the start of the pandemic. Multiple rounds of federal stimulus and the lifting of public health restrictions have resulted in multibillion-dollar operating surpluses for many states, increasing available cash and allowing for substantial deposits of funds on rainy days. Between January and June, most states revised their revenue guidance upward for fiscal 2021, with some increasing double-digit percentage point margins.

However, some states are now in a more vulnerable position if income growth slows down and returns to pre-pandemic patterns. Fiscal challenges, such as withdrawing federal aid and shifting consumer spending from goods to services, many of which are untaxed, are likely to dampen state revenue growth over the medium term.

Arizona, Nebraska and Iowa have adopted deep cuts in several tax categories. All three states had healthy reserves in fiscal 2020, which will be used to cushion short-term impacts, but the risk will increase in 2024 or 2025 if revenue growth stagnates while the latest scheduled reductions are fully implemented.

Smaller tax cuts may also prove impractical for some states such as Kansas and Oklahoma, where fiscal 2021 revenues have not significantly outperformed and / or where reserves are low for fiscal year 2021. rating category. Kansas’ fiscal 2022 tax cuts were modest, but the state’s zero rainy day fund balance remains a source of credit weakness. Even a modest tax cut could complicate Kansas’ ongoing tax consolidation if revenue growth returns to pre-pandemic levels. Oklahoma’s tax cuts, while moderate in their estimated short-term income impact, were larger than expected and could slow the state’s progress in rebuilding its depleted reserve cushion. pandemic given the moderate rebound in fiscal 2021 state revenues.

Tax changes proposed or adopted by states

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Thomas Simms Raley | Obituary https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/thomas-simms-raley-obituary/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/thomas-simms-raley-obituary/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 18:17:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/thomas-simms-raley-obituary/ Retired Lt. Col. Thomas Simms Raley, (81), of Fulshear, Texas, passed away peacefully on September 20, 2021 from a stroke. Tom was born on May 12, 1940 to his parents Cullen T. and Elna (Peggy) Raley in Tulsa, Oklahoma. After his father’s placement in Lawton, Oklahoma as the Oklahoma Highway Patroller, Tom graduated from Lawton […]]]>

Retired Lt. Col. Thomas Simms Raley, (81), of Fulshear, Texas, passed away peacefully on September 20, 2021 from a stroke.

Tom was born on May 12, 1940 to his parents Cullen T. and Elna (Peggy) Raley in Tulsa, Oklahoma. After his father’s placement in Lawton, Oklahoma as the Oklahoma Highway Patroller, Tom graduated from Lawton High School in 1958, where he set the state record for the long jump. He placed first in the final of the United States National Amateur Athletic Union Junior Olympics. In addition, he won the Outstanding Athletics and Academics Award, as well as his Eagle Scout Award in the same year. Although he was given a date at West Point, Tom decided to follow his father’s wishes and accepted a full athletic scholarship in track and field and football at the University of Oklahoma. There, he received his bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1962, then received his master’s degree in business administration from the University of Colorado in 1972.

After graduating from the OU, he commanded in the military where he made two tours of Vietnam, a tour of Korea and a tour of Germany. His tours have earned him several awards, including three Bronze Stars for his heroic actions and commandments in a combat environment and the Legion of Merit for his subsequent accomplishments in the Pentagon, which equates to a saving of eight billion dollars of taxpayers in 1982. After 20 years of service, Tom’s military career came to an honorable end, retiring as lieutenant colonel in October 1982.

Upon retirement from the military, he entered the corporate world as vice president of marketing for a tactical night vision company, giving him the opportunity to travel the world. He then worked for Merrill Lynch as a financial advisor and retired in 2006. Tom’s love of life and competitive nature were seen in everything he set out to accomplish, including the fishing, training and golf. Winning several golf tournaments in Oklahoma, Texas, Arizona, Florida and Washington DC, one of those accomplishments was a 130 yard hole in one in 2010. His hobbies included watching / trading daily on the stock market, teaching math and dance to her granddaughter and dancing with her greatest dance partner and beloved wife, Linda.

Tom got married in December 1962 and has a child. He then met the love of his life, Linda R. Raley at his 45th high school reunion and married in June 2006. Soon after he became known as “TaTom” by his family. acquired, in particular his granddaughter, Karsen.

He is survived by his wife, Linda (LaLa), his sister, Patricia Raley Welch, his sister-in-law, Delora Sanford, his brothers-in-law Ron Yoder (Sherrill), Darwin Yoder, bonus children Kristi R Council and Chip Rice (Stephanie), grandchildren, Radd Rotello (Tawny), Karsen Council, Dillon Rice, Griffin Rice (Kelli), Will Rice and great grandchildren Liam and Ava Rotello. He is also survived by his nieces Kim Hudson Brown, Laural Bodin (Tyler), Ginger Welch and several other nieces, great-nieces, nephews and close friends who will be dearly missed. Tom is predeceased by his father, Cullen Raley, his mother, Peggy Raley, his brothers-in-law, George Sanford and Dale Welch, and his sister-in-law, Marsha Mattson.

Although Tom is a highly decorated officer, he often said, “I am just a private soldier who loves my country and my family. Tom, you will be missed beyond measure.

A memorial service, with full military honors, will be held at 11:00 am on October 16, 2021 at the Davis-Greenlawn Chapel and Funeral Home, 3900 BF Terry Blvd, Rosenberg, Texas 77471. A Celebration of Life will follow at the Italian Restaurant Lomonte, 815 Plantation Drive # 180, Richmond, Texas 77406.

In lieu of flowers, please consider donating on behalf of Thomas S. Raley to the Gary Sinise Foundation, in honor of our advocates, veterans, first responders and their families, garysinisefoundation.org.

We would like to express special gratitude to Loretta, Delora (Babe) Sanford, Kim Hudson Brown and Adriana Otalora-Acosta for their tireless, caring and endless support throughout this difficult time. We would also like to thank Susan Wells and Tom and Emily Wells for their advice, support and patience over the past few months. A very special place in our hearts for Loretta, for introducing Tom and Linda, and especially Sharon and Bill Stamps for Oklahoma’s many OU games, golf tournaments and weekends, we will always cherish these fond memories. You all helped make it bearable by allowing Tom’s family and Tom to prepare for his transition to Heaven.

Tributes and words of condolence can be left for the family at www.davisgreenlawnfh.com.

Arrangements are under the direction of Davis-Greenlawn Funeral Home, 3900 BF Terry Blvd., Rosenberg, Texas 77471, Phone: 281-341-8800.


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Trump drops from Forbes list of richest 400 Americans https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/trump-drops-from-forbes-list-of-richest-400-americans/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/trump-drops-from-forbes-list-of-richest-400-americans/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 22:15:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/trump-drops-from-forbes-list-of-richest-400-americans/ through: Addy bink, Nexstar Media Wire Posted: Oct 5, 2021 / 5:15 PM CDT / Update: Oct 5, 2021 / 4:37 PM CDT FILE – In this July 11, 2021, file photo, former President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Dallas, Texas. Trump wants a Florida federal judge to force […]]]>

FILE – In this July 11, 2021, file photo, former President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Dallas, Texas. Trump wants a Florida federal judge to force Twitter to restore his account, which was suspended in January following the attack on the U.S. Capitol. Trump’s lawyers filed a preliminary injunction motion against Twitter and its CEO Jack Dorsey on Friday, October 1. (AP Photo / LM Otero, file)

(KTVX) – Since the early 1980s, Forbes has published an annual list of the 400 richest American citizens. For the first eight years – and also the last 25 years – former President Donald Trump was on this list.

Not this year.

Dan Alexander of Forbes explained that Trump, down $ 600 million since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, has lost $ 400 million below the threshold to be on this year’s list. Trump is worth around $ 2.5 billion, according to Forbes.

The last time Trump failed to make the list was in 1995. As Forbes reports, Trump was on the first list in 1982, before falling between 1990 and 1995 and returning in 1996.

Trump’s wealth has often been a topic of conversation. In a 2018 article, the New York Times challenged Trump’s claims of self-made wealth by documenting how his father, Fred, had given him at least $ 413 million over the decades, including through plans to tax avoidance. Mary Trump, the former president’s niece, identified herself in a book published last year as the source of the documents provided to The Times.

SLIDESHOW: The top five on the Forbes 400 for 2021 from first to fifth

  • Jeff Bezos

After hearing that Trump was planning to sue her and the New York Times for this story, Mary Trump told NBC News about her uncle: “I think he’s a loser, and he’s going to throw it all up against the wall. that he can. It is despair. The walls close and he throws everything against the wall he thinks to stick. As always with Donald, he will try to change the subject.

Trump, the only modern-day president not to make his tax returns public, has paid no federal income taxes in 10 of the past 15 years. Trump paid just $ 750 in federal income tax in the year he ran for President and in his freshman year in the White House, according to a 2020 report in the New York Times.

Forbes reports that Trump’s net worth of $ 2.5 billion has not been this low since 2009. That year, Trump’s net worth was estimated at $ 2 billion.

Alexander says Trump can blame himself for falling off the Forbes 400 and believes if he had decided to diversify his heavy real estate investments by putting that money into an S&P 500 index fund when he became president, he would have seen an increase of $ 2 billion. Forbes shows that Trump’s ranking on the list started to drop after he won the presidency.

Now, for the first time in 25 years, Trump is off the list. To view the full Forbes 400, click here.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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Suns doesn’t offer Deandre Ayton maximum contract extension https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/suns-doesnt-offer-deandre-ayton-maximum-contract-extension/ https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/suns-doesnt-offer-deandre-ayton-maximum-contract-extension/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 16:19:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/suns-doesnt-offer-deandre-ayton-maximum-contract-extension/ Mavericks guard Luka Doncic has secured a (super-) max rookie-wide contract extension. Hawks goaltender Trae Young has earned a maximum contract extension on a rookie scale. Thunder guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander has secured a maximum contract extension on a rookie scale. Nuggets forward Michael Porter Jr. got a maximum contract extension on the rookie scale. The […]]]>

Mavericks guard Luka Doncic has secured a (super-) max rookie-wide contract extension. Hawks goaltender Trae Young has earned a maximum contract extension on a rookie scale. Thunder guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander has secured a maximum contract extension on a rookie scale. Nuggets forward Michael Porter Jr. got a maximum contract extension on the rookie scale.

The No. 1 pick in the 2018 NBA Draft, Suns center Deandre Ayton… didn’t.

ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski:

The Phoenix Suns’ reluctance to offer a maximum extension of the 2018 No.1 rookie contract Deandre Ayton has stalled talks on a deal, sources told ESPN on Tuesday.

Ayton, a key part of the Suns’ run to the 2021 NBA Finals, has no intention of accepting a deal lower than the comparable maximum contracts signed by several of his classmates in the 2018 NBA Draft, including Trae Young of Atlanta, Luka Doncic of Dallas, Oklahoma Shai Gilgeous-Alexander of City and Michael Porter Jr. of Denver, sources told ESPN.

I don’t blame Ayton for refusing to accept less than the maximum (which should be worth $ 173 million over five years). Considering his stature as a former No.1 pick and his role in helping the Suns reach the 2021 NBA Finals, it’s somewhat surprising that the Suns haven’t offered him the maximum. He could likely get maximum bid sheets in 2022 in restricted free agency (estimated to be worth $ 128 million over four years).

For Phoenix, the decision is more complicated.

Reasons not to give Ayton a max extension:

  • He is not worth it. Ayton is both strong offensively and defensively, but he’s not part of the elite on either side. He was never an All-Star or even attracted significant consideration. While he’s a great finisher and has a mid-range shooting ability, he hasn’t extended his reach beyond the 3-point arc and he’s not much of a passer. His ability to move defensively for his size is better than his rim protection, an area that would have more impact. In a league full of at least solid crosses, teams should be particularly wary of paying too much.
  • He is already under contract for this season. The Suns would also have the corresponding rights to him next summer. Taking another year to assess its worth doesn’t mean letting it go at all.

Reasons to give Ayton a max extension:

  • He is only 23 years old and improving. Ayton has so many raw tools – size, strength, athleticism, skill. There is every reason to believe that he is on a clear upward trajectory. Phoenix wouldn’t pay for who he is, but for what he plans to be.
  • A maximum extension is the only way to lock Ayton out for five years, not just four (assuming he doesn’t require a player or an early termination option). It might be worth paying too much. It looked like the Bucks got a slight discount on Giannis Antetokounmpo’s rookie level expansion. Instead, the big story became his ability to hit unrestricted free agency a year earlier. The extra year on Ayton could be especially helpful if the salary cap skyrockets in a few years.
  • If they let him become a restricted free agent, the Suns could lose the team’s long-term control over Ayton. He could sign a 3 + 1 or even a 2 + 1 offer sheet. Heck, he could do something even more drastic: sign his qualifying offer of $ 16,422,835, gain the chance to reject any trade in the 2022-2023 season and then become an unrestricted free agent in 2023.

The big variable: How would an overtime affect Ayton this season?

Maybe being extended would make him too satisfied with what he has already accomplished and stagnate his growth. Or maybe it would put him at ease, fueling productivity.

Perhaps not being extended would destroy his bond with the team and cause him to chase individual numbers. Or maybe it would take him to even higher heights.

That’s a big consideration for Phoenix, who is at the heart of the championship fight.

The Suns, owned by Robert Sarver, are also facing spending questions. Phoenix hasn’t paid the luxury tax since 2010. Even the big spending this summer leaves the Suns well below the tax threshold this season.

But that will change the following season if Phoenix keeps its core together. Chris Paul and Cameron Payne secured multi-year contracts this summer, joining Devin Booker, Jae Crowder and Dario Saric. Ayton and Mikal Bridges are ready for new offerings.

If the Suns pay, it doesn’t matter if they commit the money now or next summer. But these Ayton negotiations leave a lot of unease about Sarver’s financial commitment.


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