Oklahoma tax – Rogers County Blue Star Mothers http://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T143024.308.png Oklahoma tax – Rogers County Blue Star Mothers http://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/ 32 32 Mockingbird Cannabis prepares to open a medical marijuana operation https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/mockingbird-cannabis-prepares-to-open-a-medical-marijuana-operation/ Wed, 18 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/mockingbird-cannabis-prepares-to-open-a-medical-marijuana-operation/ In an unincorporated area outside of Raymond is what its CEO claims is the largest medical marijuana growing and manufacturing operation in Mississippi, if not the southeastern United States. The 163,000 square foot behemoth once housed the state’s Department of Revenue but is now the headquarters of Mockingbird Cannabis, a $30 million bet on the […]]]>

In an unincorporated area outside of Raymond is what its CEO claims is the largest medical marijuana growing and manufacturing operation in Mississippi, if not the southeastern United States.

The 163,000 square foot behemoth once housed the state’s Department of Revenue but is now the headquarters of Mockingbird Cannabis, a $30 million bet on the state’s medical marijuana industry.

The facility includes 16 grow rooms, each capable of producing 250 to 300 pounds of marijuana every eight weeks. It will be operated by more than 200 employees, with the lowest paid workers earning $17 an hour.

Clint Patterson, general manager of Mockingbird Cannabis, said he expects they will see demand for this volume of product since 74% of voters approved of the medical marijuana program.

“I think if we were really transparent and honest, there’s probably a billion-dollar cannabis industry right now in Mississippi,” Patterson said. “It’s just not legal.”

Patterson, a former prosecutor and son of a nondenominational pastor, is an unlikely marijuana kingpin.

Even though cannabis was illegal in Oklahoma, Patterson’s home state, he says he never thought the drug was bad or dangerous.

“I was definitely for regulation and legalization,” Patterson said. “So when it happened, I jumped in.”

Patterson’s Oklahoma marijuana business started out small, with just a 1,200 square foot lab that made vape cartridges. This then grew into six different growing and manufacturing sites.

“Oklahoma is the toughest place to compete in the country, and we do what we do pretty well here,” Patterson said. “It gave us the confidence to go to other states that had better situations, business-wise, than Oklahoma.”

A look inside the 163,000 square foot Mockingbird cannabis facility currently under construction at Raymond on Tuesday, May 10, 2022. Credit: Vickie D. King/Mississippi Today

Slates Veazey, a Jackson attorney who advises cannabis companies, said it’s impossible to predict the importance of medical marijuana in Mississippi, but it will undoubtedly be a major economic driver in the state.

“There’s a lot of interest in this new industry…in every state that’s legalized medical marijuana, you’ve seen big companies and smaller mom and pop types pop up and compete and succeed,” Veazey said.

Patterson said Mockingbird is the culmination of everything they learned operating in Oklahoma. Putting all parts of the operation under one roof will reduce overhead.

The science around marijuana production is also constantly evolving, Patterson said. Everything from how plants are lit and fed has evolved since they started building Mockingbird. For the former, they switched from incandescent bulbs to more energy-efficient LEDs that can be raised and lowered. They also partnered with Upchurch Plumbing to develop a computerized fertigation system, which combines agricultural fertilization and irrigation processes to deliver nutritional cocktails tailored to the stage of plant development.

“What we thought was cutting edge two years ago, no one is even doing it anymore,” Patterson said “…It really is the most advanced and modern facility we can even design. “

Patterson said when medical marijuana was legalized in Oklahoma, big out-of-state companies came in and took most of the market share. As a result, profits left the state.

Knowing that Mississippi, like Oklahoma, is one of the poorest states in the country, Patterson said he and his team decided they would work to prevent that if they wanted to become one of the major players. of the medical marijuana industry in Mississippi.

“We took a lot of time, met a lot of people here, and raised most of our money from Mississippians… We’re going to make a lot of money here, and we wanted that to have the desired effect,” Patterson said. .

Mockingbird investors in the state did not back down after the Mississippi Supreme Court struck down the 2020 voter-approved medical marijuana program on a constitutional technicality.

“We got everybody together and said, ‘Hey, 74% of the state voted for this. There is going to be a program, it may not be happening right now,” Patterson said.

One such investor is Leah Vincent of Pickens. Vincent pooled money with her husband in late 2019 to invest in Mockingbird.

After the state Supreme Court struck down Initiative 65, Vincent considered the move merely delaying the inevitable.

“It’s fucking Mississippi,” Vincent said. “They just have to drag things out. And it’s about saving political face. I’ve lived here in Mississippi all my life so it was expected but still frustrating.”

Vincent and her husband see their investment as a retirement plan and are convinced that recreational marijuana will eventually be legalized in Mississippi.

“We knew Mississippi was going to be different (from other legal states),” Vincent said. “But on the road, it’s going to be bigger everywhere. I mean, it’s coming.

A plumber works on the sprinkler system in a grow room at the Mockingbird Cannabis facility, currently under construction in Raymond, Tuesday, May 10, 2022. Credit: Vickie D. King/Mississippi Today

Even though it took longer than expected for the Legislature to pass a medical marijuana bill, Mockingbird never stopped building. Patterson said he thinks other up-and-coming marijuana companies are doing the exact opposite.

“They’re going to be a little slower to start,” Patterson said. “We took a risk and bet on the state doing what we felt was the right thing to do, and they did. So we are ready and primed, and we will take advantage of it.

Patterson estimates that Mississippi will collect between $150 million and $200 million in tax revenue and an additional $50 million to $100 million in business fees in the first full year of the medical marijuana program.

He did not provide a source for those estimates when questioned by Mississippi Today.

This staggering figure would make medical marijuana a bigger source of tax revenue than the state’s casino industry, which put $153,724,705 into state coffers in fiscal year 2021. That would rival also with state alcohol, beer, and tobacco sales, which generated combined tax revenue of $283,667,815 during the same period.

It would also be more tax revenue than that generated by Oklahoma’s medical marijuana industry, which is widely considered a de facto recreational program due to lax requirements for obtaining a medical marijuana card.

“Ten percent of our population currently has a medical marijuana card…and two to three people use each of those cards…I didn’t know there were that many sick people in Oklahoma,” said Oklahoma State Rep. Scott Fetgatter to the Mississippi Senate audience. Health and Welfare Committee at a hearing in June 2021.

Between Oklahoma’s legalization of medical marijuana in 2018 and May 2020, the state only collected $110 million from the state’s 7% marijuana tax and an additional $138 million from taxes. national and local sales outlets, according to Oklahoman.

The Mississippi Department of Health plans to begin accepting online license applications for patients and medical marijuana businesses next month.

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California Government Cannabis Tax Reduction (Newsletter: May 16, 2022) https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/california-government-cannabis-tax-reduction-newsletter-may-16-2022/ Mon, 16 May 2022 10:13:40 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/california-government-cannabis-tax-reduction-newsletter-may-16-2022/ Delayed OH legalization; New York Community Marijuana Gardens; Poll: Voters Support Cannabis Reform; NJ Surveillance Hearing; banking stand Subscribe to get the Marijuana Moment newsletter delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. It’s the best way to make sure you know what cannabis stories are shaping the day. Your support makes Marijuana Moment possible… BREAK: […]]]>

Delayed OH legalization; New York Community Marijuana Gardens; Poll: Voters Support Cannabis Reform; NJ Surveillance Hearing; banking stand

Subscribe to get the Marijuana Moment newsletter delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. It’s the best way to make sure you know what cannabis stories are shaping the day.

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/ THINGS TO KNOW

Ohio activists and state officials agreed that a marijuana legalization initiative will not appear on the state ballot this year, but they reached a lawsuit settlement that puts the campaign on a path to potential qualification for 2023.

California Governor Gavin Newsom (D) released an updated budget proposal that would eliminate the state marijuana grow tax in an effort to help legal and licensed businesses better compete in the illicit market.

A new poll has revealed that 70% of American adults want to legalize marijuana nationwide or at least end federal prohibition so states can enact reform. In all demographic groups, only a minority wants to maintain criminalization at all levels.

A New York Senator filed a new bill to legalize what would essentially be community marijuana gardens for people who are unable to grow cannabis for personal use in their own homes.

the New Jersey Senate Judiciary Committee held a monitoring hearing on regulators’ efforts to implement marijuana legalization.

People’s Ecosystem Frederika McClary Easley argues in a new op-ed in Marijuana Moment that blocking cannabis banks “is against social equity and against the thousands of legal state enterprises…who desperately need help” .

/ FEDERAL

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki reacted to another report on funding safe “crack pipes” in harm reduction kits, calling it a “conspiracy theory”.

Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) delivered a speech in the Senate recognizing the 10th anniversary of US drug officials massacring people during a counter-narcotics operation in Honduras.

Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) spoke about the prospects of enacting legislation on cannabis banks.

Democratic Senate candidate from Louisiana Gary Chambers tweeted, “The cannabis conversation is about justice and jobs. It’s really simple. 1. No one should be in jail for a plant. 2. We can create well-paying jobs through this industry.

Republican Senate candidate from North Carolina Pat McCrorya former governor, said he opposes the legalization of marijuana.

The House Bill legalize medical cannabis for veterans got a new co-sponsor for a total of 18.

/ STATES

New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu (right) and other officials have issued a warning over the alleged mixing of fentanyl with marijuana and other drugs.

Oregon Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tobias Reed, currently state treasurer, tweeted, “I have long been a strong supporter of the SAFE Banking Act and have led the fight with my fellow state treasurers. This is something that embarrasses too many small cannabis businesses here in Oregon and I promise to keep fighting!

Hawaii Lawmakers have sent Gov. David Ige (D) a bill to allow inter-island transportation of medical cannabis and extend the caregiver culture sunset for an unlimited number of patients through 2024.

Missouri lawmakers have sent Governor Mike Parson (right) a bill to regulate kratom.

the Rhode Island Both the Senate Judiciary Committee and the House Finance Committee are expected to vote on revised marijuana legalization bills on Wednesday.

A New York The assemblyman tweeted: “When it comes to treating serious mental illnesses such as PTSD, depression and various substance abuse disorders, all options must be on the table. We need to pass the medical #psilocybin now. Separately, another assembly member authored an op-ed saying lawmakers should pass cannabis-impaired driving legislation.

A Michigan Representative spoke about her bill to ban marijuana billboards.

Vermont Regulators will consider recommendations to issue the first full commercial marijuana license on Monday.

California regulators have reportedly issued the first cannabis consumption license for a street fair.

washington state regulators have contracted with a safety management company to provide marijuana businesses with voluntary and free on-site safety assessments.

Many Illinois marijuana regulators quit their jobs.

Oklahoma The top medical cannabis regulator has provided an update on the state’s tracking system.

South Dakota medical cannabis patient enrollments are increasing.


Marijuana Moment is already tracking more than 1,000 cannabis, psychedelics and drug bills in state legislatures and Congress this year. Patreon supporters who commit to at least $25/month have access to our interactive maps, charts, and audience schedule so they don’t miss a thing.

Learn more about our marijuana bill tracker and become a supporter on Patreon to gain access.

/ LOCAL

Fayette County, Kentucky shared their views on marijuana law enforcement.

/ INTERNATIONAL

Bermuda The governor said she would reserve assent to a marijuana legalization bill because of the international drug treaties.

UK Members of the Labor shadow cabinet criticize the mayor of London’s marijuana reform measures.

from Mexico The Senate president reacted to a Supreme Court ruling on the constitutionality of criminalizing marijuana possession, saying lawmakers were continuing to work on legalization legislation. the Senate Majority Leader also addressed the decision.

the Trinidad and Tobago The Court of Appeals is being asked to clarify a possible loophole in a marijuana conviction reversal law.

/ SCIENCE & HEALTH

One study suggested that “active marijuana users hospitalized with COVID-19[feminine] had better clinical outcomes compared to nonusers, including a decreased need for ICU admission or mechanical ventilation.

One review concluded that “CBD may offer promising therapeutic potential for the treatment of [substance use disorders]in particular for nicotine, cannabis and opioid use disorders, based on available human studies”, but that “available research evidence is, however, sparse and more research in humans is needed” .

/ ADVOCACY, OPINION & ANALYSIS

the Alabama Democratic Party tweeted, “The effect of cannabis in reducing opioid abuse is well documented. Legalizing it could save thousands of lives.

the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition released a statement criticizing the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies for its handling of an allegation of sexual and physical abuse during a clinical trial for MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.

/ BUSINESS

Aurora Cannabis Inc. reported quarterly net revenue of C$50.4 million and an adjusted EBITDA loss of C$12.3 million.

iAnthus Capital Holdings, Inc. reported quarterly revenue of $42.8 million and a net loss of $10.1 million.

Glass House Brands Inc. reported quarterly revenue of $14 million and a net loss of $19.8 million.

Leafly Holdings, Inc. reported quarterly revenue of $11.4 million and a net loss of $19.4 million.

WM Technology, Inc. launched an integrated digital payment process for cannabis businesses in Ontario, Canada.

/ CULTURE

The pretrial detention of an American basketball player Britney Griner has been extended for a month as she faces charges in Russia for alleged possession of cannabis vape cartridges at an airport.

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Marijuana Moment is made possible by the support of readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon Pledge.

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Clinton associates quit Black Lives Matter – Law Officer https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/clinton-associates-quit-black-lives-matter-law-officer/ Sat, 14 May 2022 14:10:49 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/clinton-associates-quit-black-lives-matter-law-officer/ Share and defend justice, law and order… In what could be a sign for what’s to come, two of Bill and Hillary Clinton’s top allies have left their positions on the board of directors of the nonprofit National Black Lives Matter. According to the New York Post, citing tax documents, Minyon Moore and Marc Elias […]]]>

Share and defend justice, law and order…

In what could be a sign for what’s to come, two of Bill and Hillary Clinton’s top allies have left their positions on the board of directors of the nonprofit National Black Lives Matter. According to the New York Post, citing tax documents, Minyon Moore and Marc Elias were missing from registration forms submitted in Florida and Oklahoma on behalf of the band on April 28.

Both were previously listed as members of the organization’s board of directors in February tax filings.

Elias was appointed to the board in February to help the organization manage its dodgy finances. Elias, served as general counsel for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign and was responsible for hiring Fusion GPS, the opposition research firm credited with creating the infamous Steele dossier. Minyon Moore was formerly former President Clinton’s last White House political affairs director.

Elias was first discovered to be involved in Black Lives Matter when his law firm filed 2020 tax documents for BLMGNF, which claim the group received no donations or gave any grants despite over $65 million that year.

After a few months, Elias and Moore reportedly left the nonprofit.

Share and defend justice, law and order…

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Brent Venables and Sooners coaches react to NIL guidelines https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/brent-venables-and-sooners-coaches-react-to-nil-guidelines/ Fri, 13 May 2022 01:55:40 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/brent-venables-and-sooners-coaches-react-to-nil-guidelines/ DUNCAN – Brent Venables is all for players benefiting from his name, image and likeness. “I think it’s really cool that we’ve finally figured it out and created a little space for this,” the OU football coach said Thursday as the OU coaches caravan stopped at the field. Stephens County Fairgrounds. “And with good intention. […]]]>
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Senator Simpson honored by the National Guard with the Oklahoma Thunderbird Medal https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/senator-simpson-honored-by-the-national-guard-with-the-oklahoma-thunderbird-medal/ Wed, 11 May 2022 11:12:48 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/senator-simpson-honored-by-the-national-guard-with-the-oklahoma-thunderbird-medal/ Special at Armoreite OKLAHOMA CITY – Senator Frank Simpson was recently honored in the Senate for his tireless support and legislative contributions to the Oklahoma National Guard during his tenure in the Senate. Republican Springer was awarded the Oklahoma Thunderbird Medal for “outstanding service, achievement, or contributions made in support of Oklahoma National Guard missions” […]]]>

Special at Armoreite

OKLAHOMA CITY – Senator Frank Simpson was recently honored in the Senate for his tireless support and legislative contributions to the Oklahoma National Guard during his tenure in the Senate. Republican Springer was awarded the Oklahoma Thunderbird Medal for “outstanding service, achievement, or contributions made in support of Oklahoma National Guard missions” by Oklahoma Adjutant General Brig. Gen. Thomas Mancino and Oklahoma Air National Guard Senior Enlisted Leader, Chief Master Sgt. Scott Irwin. The medal is the highest honor bestowed by the Guard on a civilian, and Simpson is the first senator to receive it.

“It was a total surprise,” Simpson said on the floor. “I’m not usually at a loss for words, but I can’t tell you how much I’ve enjoyed the 12 years I’ve served each of you here. The nice thing about veterans legislation is that it’s bipartisan and everyone wants to help our veterans, which makes it easier to pass veterans’ bills. I want to thank you all for the support you have shown my fellow veterans, our National Guard, and our men and women in the military here in Oklahoma. It’s a huge, huge honor. »

During his nearly twelve years in the Senate, the Navy veteran and chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs and Military Affairs Committee drafted numerous bills to help support Oklahoma’s active military, including ​including the Oklahoma National Guard, veterans and their families. Its legislation provided sales tax exemption for spouses and widows of 100% disabled veterans, state benefits for peacetime veterans, and non-institutional community care for aging and/or disabled veterans. terminal stage who cannot live on their own. His efforts have helped improve Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) services by strengthening agency oversight and training and educating Veterans Center staff. His work has also led to the creation of peer-supported Veterans Welcome Centers across the state, another state veterans cemetery, veterans designations, and veterans 100% disabled veterans on driver’s licenses, and a grant to ensure indigent veterans receive a proper burial. Obtaining a higher education is also more affordable for veterans and the military thanks to its bills.

“Senator Simpson represents the best of public service in both the Oklahoma State Senate and the United States Navy,” Mancino said. “It has been a privilege to know and work with him over the past 12 years.”

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Tax revenue deluge hits southwestern states in April https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/tax-revenue-deluge-hits-southwestern-states-in-april/ Mon, 09 May 2022 14:42:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/tax-revenue-deluge-hits-southwestern-states-in-april/ April tax receipts set records in southwestern states as a strong economy and high inflation boosted income and sales tax receipts, although some officials are urging caution then that uncertainty darkens the months to come. Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas posted record collections as states begin reporting their April revenue performance. All is well for the […]]]>

April tax receipts set records in southwestern states as a strong economy and high inflation boosted income and sales tax receipts, although some officials are urging caution then that uncertainty darkens the months to come.

Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas posted record collections as states begin reporting their April revenue performance.

All is well for the state coffers, according to Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.

Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, says all is well for government coffers, although recession risks loom.

Bloomberg News

“The labor market is strong, supporting tax revenue, consumer spending is robust, fueling sales tax revenue, corporate profits are soaring, fueling corporate taxes and house prices increase, which increases property tax revenue,” he said. “Of course, high inflation is also a powerful tailwind for income growth.”

Zandi warned that revenue growth will falter going forward as the Federal Reserve works to slow economic growth and contain inflation, which rose 8.5% in the 12 months to in March, its biggest increase since December 1981.

“Recession risks are also on the rise. Now is the time for state and local government officials to build their rainy day funds,” he said.

April is typically the biggest income month for states that tax personal income and last month marked the first time since 2019 that those returns were due in April. The COVID-19 pandemic has led the US Internal Revenue Service to delay its April 15 tax filing deadline in 2020 and 2021, with states following suit.

Oklahoma’s gross receipts topped $2 billion for the first time in a month, propelled by personal and corporate income taxes, which raised $1.1 billion.

“The record performance numbers are a testament to the strength of the state’s economy,” State Treasurer Randy McDaniel said in a statement. “Even so, there are signs that would urge caution in the future.”

He pointed out that sales and use tax receipts rose by less than the rate of inflation at 2.9%, and that gross production and motor vehicle revenues are below April 2021 collections. .

Still, gross revenues from oil and natural gas production hit a record high in March and total tax revenue over a 12-month period rose $2.86 billion, or 21.1%, from the previous 12 months.

Texas, which does not tax personal income, reported its biggest April for sales taxes, its biggest source of state revenue, with $3.83 billion raised, up 12.8% compared to April 2021.

“State sales tax collections reached a new high for the month of April, with double-digit growth reflecting both inflation and the continued expansion of real economic activity and employment,” Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar said in a statement.

Some of the state’s other taxes recorded their highest monthly collections on record — $666 million from the oil production tax, $76 million from the hotel occupancy tax and $152 million taxes on alcoholic beverages.

With four months left in the state’s fiscal year, tax revenue from oil production exceeded total collections for fiscal year 2021 by 9.7%, at $3.78 billion. Year-to-date sales tax revenue, at $28 billion, was up 22.3% from the same period a year ago.

April also brought Arkansas its largest monthly net income inflow in state history, topping the $1 billion mark for the first time at $1.125 billion, $532 million more than the economic forecast for the month.

At $810.8 million, personal income tax revenue nearly doubled the forecast for the month. Two months to the end of fiscal 2022, general fund revenue is already nearly $1 billion higher than forecast.

Governor Asa Hutchinson said a booming economy and rising prices for consumer goods had boosted incomes, but warned of “significant uncertainty” about the national economic outlook.

Taxpayers need and deserve at least some of the surplus returned to them because the state should not generate such a large surplus,” he said in a statement, adding that the state must be careful when considering the options. for the surplus.

As Arkansas recorded its largest monthly influx of net tax revenue, Gov. Asa Hutchinson warns of “significant uncertainty” about the national economic outlook.

Bloomberg News

Records will likely be set in other states as well, according to Justin Theal, a state fiscal health project officer at The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Outside of the Southwest region, Illinois’ general fund revenue of $8.037 billion in April was the highest base revenue total for any month in state history and was been driven by a record month for income tax collection, according to a report by the legislative agency.

Rising incomes have triggered tax cuts in several states, Theal said.

“Whenever there are good budget years, policymakers definitely feel the pressure to return some of that budget surplus to the taxpayer” or to increase spending or expand certain programs, he said.

About a third of states are pursuing “significant general fund tax reforms this legislative session,” S&P Global Ratings reported last month.

With April tax receipts of $1.51 billion beating recently revised estimates of 13.4%, Democratic Kansas Governor Laura Kelly called for an accelerated removal of the state’s sales tax on groceries.

“These tax collection receipts reiterate the fiscal health of the state and make it clear that we can afford to push back the ‘food tax ax’ implementation date to July 1 of this year,” he said. she said in a statement. “I call on the Kansas Legislature to do so as soon as they return later this month.”

A bill passed by the Republican-controlled Legislature last month cuts the tax to 4%, from 6.5% on Jan. 1, 2023, to 2% in 2024, and eliminates it in early 2025.

Brian Sigritz, director of state tax studies at the National Association of State Budget Officers, said nearly all state revenue is above fiscal year 2022 projections and, in some cases, exceeded the upwardly revised estimates.

“Revenue streams have remained very unpredictable and highly volatile. It remains difficult to predict state tax revenues due to what we have seen happening with both the economy and the pandemic,” he said, adding that projections call for less growth over the course of fiscal year 2023, which begins July 1 for most states.

In its report, S&P said it expects states to begin fiscal year 2023 “with an increased fiscal cushion, following recent legislative moves across the country to direct portions of recent excess revenue to reserves for rainy days”.

“While we believe some state budgets are better positioned than others for slower growth, we expect historically high levels of reserves over the past decade will support stability over the next fiscal cycle,” said the rating agency.

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Reviews | After Roe, Republicans should embrace these family-friendly policies https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/reviews-after-roe-republicans-should-embrace-these-family-friendly-policies/ Sat, 07 May 2022 15:00:08 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/reviews-after-roe-republicans-should-embrace-these-family-friendly-policies/ Before last year’s temporary expansion, about a third of American children – about 23 million children – lived in families that received less than the full amount of child support. (For example, before the expansion, a family with two children earning $20,000 a year would qualify for a child tax credit check of only $2,625, […]]]>

Before last year’s temporary expansion, about a third of American children – about 23 million children – lived in families that received less than the full amount of child support. (For example, before the expansion, a family with two children earning $20,000 a year would qualify for a child tax credit check of only $2,625, while a family earning $200,000 would receive all of the $4,000.) tax code to a monthly benefit of $300, with an additional $50 per month for children under 6, would be a tangible way to make life easier for low-income parents and the working class.

Last year, of course, the Biden administration extended the child tax credit to virtually all families, including those without workers. But as I explored for The Times last year, many working-class parents saw the idea of ​​unconditional cash benefits going to families without workers as fundamentally unfair. Polls also suggest that child benefits unrelated to work are unpopular.

A conservative family-friendly economic agenda would incorporate the idea that work is an important part of engaging in society and caring for one’s family. This principle could be tied to the child tax credit in a way designed to be administratively clear and simple: to qualify for the monthly payments, families would have to meet an income threshold, such as the federal poverty level for a single person ($13,590 a year in 2022). Families with incomes below that threshold would see their benefits cut, allaying Tory concerns about perverse work incentives. (Parents who earned 50% of the threshold would, for example, have their monthly child allowance amount cut in half, but would continue to be eligible for safety net programs.)

This approach would create an easily understandable link between receiving child benefit and having at least one working parent and would be partly funded by bundling the tangle of existing child benefit, tax credit adjustments on earned income and child care deductions into a single monthly benefit. . It would recognize that families should not lose benefits for having additional children and ensure that low-income couples are not penalized by marriage.

Beyond the tax code, congressional Republicans could play to their supply-side strengths and champion a cost-of-living program aimed at some of parents’ biggest headaches: health care, childcare, and more. children and housing. They could listen to Robert Orr of the center-right Niskanen Center and increase the number of health professionals while experimenting with increased cost sharing for maternal and child health care. They could expand childcare options by building the capacity of faith-based and community-based providers rather than relying on large-scale subsidies. And they could reduce the cost of housing by tackling environmental regulations and restrictive zoning laws that prevent housing supply from meeting demand.

This policy agenda will force Republicans to curtail their usual impulse to seek tax cuts as a panacea. But if put into practice, they can show how parents’ lives can be made easier by applying traditional conservative principles about work, incentives and regulation to contemporary issues, without requiring Build Back Better-style federal intervention.

A favorable ruling by Dobbs would certainly not transform the GOP into a European-style Christian Democratic party overnight. But some actions at the state level show signs of the party moving in a more pro-family direction while retaining its core principles. Texas’ clandestine abortion ban grabbed most of the headlines, but the state also passed a bipartisan expansion of Medicaid for mothers up to six months postpartum. Idaho and Oklahoma, with Republican-dominated legislatures, have introduced child tax credits at the state level, and politically divided Minnesota could become the 10th to do so, in negotiations current budgets.

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‘Culture war’ bills could cost state jobs and damage reputation https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/culture-war-bills-could-cost-state-jobs-and-damage-reputation/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 23:56:29 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/culture-war-bills-could-cost-state-jobs-and-damage-reputation/ Legislative leaders and Gov. Kevin Stitt spent the week advancing a series of ‘culture war’ bills meant to please some voters but could cost the state the biggest development contract ever. economy of the year. (Photo by Janice Francis-Smith) OKLAHOMA CITY — Legislative leaders and Gov. Kevin Stitt spent the week advancing a series of […]]]>

Legislative leaders and Gov. Kevin Stitt spent the week advancing a series of ‘culture war’ bills meant to please some voters but could cost the state the biggest development contract ever. economy of the year. (Photo by Janice Francis-Smith)

OKLAHOMA CITY — Legislative leaders and Gov. Kevin Stitt spent the week advancing a series of “culture war” bills meant to please some voters but could cost the state the biggest development contract ever. economy of the year.

The Oklahoma House of Representatives passed a series of bills Thursday morning dealing with abortion, trans people, school programs, voting and protest rights, in time to meet a legislative deadline.

For several bills, the Republican majority agreed to suspend the rules in order to replace the wording of the bills that were due to be heard Thursday with brand new language submitted hours before.

This is how Senate Bill 615, which had been a bill requiring school administrators to approve all sex education programs, turned into a “toilet bill” requiring schools to provide toilets exclusively for men and women and requiring students to use the toilet that matches their biological sex as listed on their birth certificate. Schools that violate the law face a 5% cut in state funding.

Stitt’s cabinet appointee, Education Secretary Ryan Walters, has focused on the issue of school restrooms as he campaigns for the elected post of Superintendent of Public Instruction. Walters has shared with the media letters he wrote to the Stillwater Board of Education, twice accusing the board of a “wake-up call” for not forcing students to use the toilets that match the gender on their birth certificates, and a letter to Attorney General John O’Connor asking him to take legal action.

State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister – who is running for governor – has sought legal advice from O’Connor regarding Stillwater’s restroom policy and resisted legislative demands asking her to implement a wide rule of the state until O’Connor issues an opinion.

Rep. Forrest Bennett, D-Oklahoma City, said his district has invested in improvements designed to attract businesses and workers, and bills like SB 615 are ruining those efforts.

“No amount of self-investment by cities like OKC, or state incentives and tax breaks, can overcome hateful legislation aimed at already marginalized groups,” Bennett said. “In the coming days, I hope municipal leaders will join us in speaking out against this harmful bill. Senate Bill 615 hurts people. This hinders progress. It hurts Oklahoma.

Rep. Monroe Nichols, D-Tulsa, also asked how the bill would affect economic development. “We voted and I supported a $700 million economic incentive to hopefully entice a Fortune 500 company to open a plant in Oklahoma,” Nichols said. “However, I fear that with Senate Bill 615, we have just caused over $700 million in reputational damage to our state.

“We’ve seen the massive fallout from legislation like this in other states,” Nichols said. “Many companies, like Panasonic for example, are clear and demonstrate their support for the LGBTQ community. Economic development is not just about money and tax incentives. Companies will not choose to have their employees and their families subject to laws that ostracize and marginalize their existence.

Nichols added, “SB615 isn’t just a bad bill, it’s a job killer.”

Just a few weeks ago, the legislature passed and Stitt signed an agreement to provide approximately $700 million to a public limited company that is expected to invest $4 billion to establish a battery manufacturing plant in the area of Tulsa.

Panasonic is known to seek to set up a manufacturing plant in Oklahoma or Kansas. The company supplies batteries for the Tesla electric vehicle factory in Texas.

Earlier in the year, the Kansas legislature also provided a package of tax incentives to lure the manufacturer.

But unlike Oklahoma, Kansas has not passed Oklahoma’s extreme bills in recent weeks.

Last week, the Kansas House of Representatives backed Governor Laura Kelly’s veto of a bill that would have banned transgender athletes from playing on sports teams consistent with their gender identity. Stitt signed a similar measure into law in Oklahoma.

The Kansas House also supported the governor’s veto of legislation that would have created a Bill of Parental Rights, although the state senate voted to override the veto.

The Kansas legislature also avoided imposing an abortion ban on its citizens, allowing voters to decide the issue this fall.

During this year’s session, Oklahoma lawmakers passed a law barring the state from doing business with companies that don’t share the values ​​of their constituents. The Legislature has voted to advance bills that would prohibit the state or any municipality in the state from entering into contracts with banks that refuse to lend money to gun manufacturers, or with companies that reject the use of oil and gas in favor of renewable energy.

Several lawmakers have denounced companies whose policies adhere to a concept known as environmental, social, or ESG governance. On the floor of the Legislature, lawmakers who opposed granting tax incentives to the anonymous company, claimed that ESG policies condoned leftist ideology.

The Panasonic North America website highlights its adherence to ESG policies.

Recognizing that census data indicates that by 2060 minority groups will represent 55% of the US population, Panasonic North America is focused on expanding its diversity and inclusion efforts.

“In 2021, PNA will focus on two key DEI strategic priorities, Culture & Belonging and Talent. Specifically, we will continue to support our Business Impact Groups (BIGs): RISE (formerly Women’s Connect), Veterans Group, PRISM (LGBTQ Support), Level Up (Millennials) and the Black Employee Network (BEN),” company policy reads, “BIGs are instrumental in supporting recruitment, retention and advancement We will also continue to deepen our DEI learning and build on the unconscious bias training that was launched earlier this year and has impacted more than 12,000 employees.

The company is also committed to fighting climate change, reducing emissions and promoting “clean energy”.

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VIEWPOINT: Garfield County Jail Proposal – A Real Dilemma | Opinion https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/viewpoint-garfield-county-jail-proposal-a-real-dilemma-opinion/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/viewpoint-garfield-county-jail-proposal-a-real-dilemma-opinion/ Garfield County commissioners are moving forward with plans to raise sales tax for the Garfield County Detention Center by 0.3% in the Aug. 23 election ballot. This would be a 0.30% sales tax increase in perpetuity, an addition to the current 0.25% tax on county jails, which extends to 2033. The increase of 5% of […]]]>

Garfield County commissioners are moving forward with plans to raise sales tax for the Garfield County Detention Center by 0.3% in the Aug. 23 election ballot. This would be a 0.30% sales tax increase in perpetuity, an addition to the current 0.25% tax on county jails, which extends to 2033. The increase of 5% of the property tax the owners have paid for the prison settlement over the past three years. will retire in 2023.

The prison administrator, Ben Crooks, did a very good job of pointing out the prison’s problems and trying to come up with a solution. In a recent meeting with Mr Crooks, he indicated that the average daily population forecast for 2022 at the prison is 252 inmates per day. The approved operating capacity is 193 inmates. The nominal capacity of the prison is 232, but this number cannot be maintained for long periods. The current situation does not allow adequate segregation of prisoners. First-time offenders and non-violent offenders can sometimes be in groups with hardened criminals.

The proposed prison expansion would increase the prison’s capacity by 82 beds and cost approximately $8.5 million. The new tax would also provide additional funding for operations. The expansion would consist of dormitory-style accommodation and inmates would be required to participate in education, counselling, life skills and treatment programmes. The new construction would include appropriate medical space as well as administrative and visitor spaces.

Prison overcrowding is a multifaceted problem. Improving education, mental health and addictions services are key to reducing recidivism. Inmates at the Garfield County Detention Center are awaiting trial and the process has lengthened. According to Mr Crooks, the average stay of an inmate at the prison was 15 days. It is currently 21 days. Reducing the arbitration period would help considerably.

Those promoting this expansion of prisons have clearly established that there is a need. However, Garfield County voters must also consider whether this perpetual sales tax increase is the highest and best use of our public resources.

If this 0.30% county jail tax is approved, our sales tax rate in Enid will be 9.4%. Enid’s current 9.1% sales tax includes Oklahoma (4.5%), City-General Fund (2%), City-Capital Projects (1%), City-Public Safety (0.25%) , City-Water/Kaw Lake Pipeline (1%), County-Jail (.25%) and County-Rural Fire (.1%). The 0.1% rural fire tax expires in 2024, but will need to be renewed. The current 0.25% county jail tax expires in 2033. The 1% municipal tax for capital projects expires in 2042 and the 1% water/Lake Kaw tax expires in 2052. All the others are in progress.

What will be the source of funding for quality of life improvements and projects that will help attract young people in the future? Is a 9.4% sales tax the limit local voters will support?

I understand Garfield County receives $12 million in federal money from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). County commissioners allocate $2.7 million from ARPA to the jail. The county must currently subsidize prison operations by about $100,000 per month ($1.2 million per year). If the prison’s operating costs are fully covered by the new tax, providing $2.7 million in one-time federal money is a great compromise for the county. I’m sure there’s a lot of need in the counties, but could this ARPA jail allowance be bigger?

About five years ago, state voters approved State Questions 780 and 781, criminal justice reform measures designed to reduce the population of the Department of Corrections. SQ 781 clarified that savings from these measures would be distributed to counties to address addiction and mental health issues in county jails. It was expected to save about $10 million per year. A backgrounder on the proposed 0.30% sales tax says county jails received none of that $50 million.

Would that money have helped reduce our prison population? Could some of the $50 million be used to help fund a prison expansion? Where is this money? Maybe a state audit is in order.

As the August election nears, voters in Garfield County must weigh the jail’s needs and funding options. It will also be important to consider Enid’s fiscal capacity and future funding needs. There will no doubt be other issues and funding priorities to be addressed later.

Blankenship is Chief Executive Officer of the Greater Enid Chamber of Commerce.

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Georgia Flat Income Tax | What there is to know https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/georgia-flat-income-tax-what-there-is-to-know/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 12:21:00 +0000 https://rogerscountybluestarmothers.com/georgia-flat-income-tax-what-there-is-to-know/ Jared Walczak of the Tax Foundation says Georgia is one of sixteen states to pass tax reform in recent months ATLANTA — Tax cuts are coming to Georgia, and an expert said that once the state income tax rate begins to drop, it will be difficult for Georgia to raise them again. Governor Brian Kemp […]]]>

Jared Walczak of the Tax Foundation says Georgia is one of sixteen states to pass tax reform in recent months

ATLANTA — Tax cuts are coming to Georgia, and an expert said that once the state income tax rate begins to drop, it will be difficult for Georgia to raise them again.

Governor Brian Kemp has signed legislation that sets the wheels in motion to move Georgia to a “flat” income tax. The bill provides for the flat rate to drop from 2024 and continue to drop to 4.99% in 2029.

Georgia is one of three states to approve a move to a flat income tax rate this year. Iowa and Mississippi are the others. Nine other states have a flat income tax where everyone pays the same rate, regardless of income.

Jared Walczak of the Tax Foundation in Washington DC said Georgia is one of 16 states that have implemented some kind of tax reform in the past year and a half.

“Everyone will see a slightly lower tax bill,” Walczak explained. “We’re not talking about eye-popping cuts, but there will be lower tax bills.”

Georgian lawmakers approved the flat tax during the recent legislative session. Critics said it benefited high-income families while depriving the state of funds to help the needy.

Walczak says companies are often drawn to states with a flat income tax rate, in part because it’s easier for them to project revenue.

“We are in an era of increased mobility,” he said. “People, individuals and businesses can increasingly move and work wherever they want, which puts the emphasis on tax competition.”

While the tax cut won’t happen for a while, Walczak said, once rates start to come down, Georgia is unlikely to back down.

“The political challenge of raising a tax on everybody is much more difficult than saying, ‘well, you know, here’s 10% of the taxpayers, let’s raise taxes on them.'”

There are provisions that could temporarily suspend the lowering of the tax rate if the state reaches a financially struggling year.

Oklahoma is also considering moving to a flat tax.

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